IB Diploma Programme

 IB Diploma Programme

The IB Diploma Programme is designed as an academically challenging and balanced programme of education with final examinations that prepares students for success at university and life beyond. The programme is taught over two years and has gained recognition and respect from the world’s leading universities.

IB2 ToK 18 19

Pictured IB2 at ToK Seminar 2018- 2019

 

Since the late 1960s, the programme has:

  • Provided a package of education that balances subject breadth and depth, and considers the nature of knowledge across disciplines through the unique theory of knowledge course;
  • Encouraged international-mindedness in IB students, starting with a foundation in their own language and culture;
  • Developed a positive attitude to learning that prepares students for university education;
  • Gained a reputation for its rigorous external assessment with published global standards, making this a qualification welcomed by universities worldwide; and
  • Emphasised the development of the whole student – physically, intellectually, emotionally, and ethically.
  • The course on the History and Geography of the Kingdom and the course on Islamic Civilisation are compulsory for students where applicable.
 
 
 

Reasons why the International Baccalaureate Programme is the best preparation for university:

  • It provides students with academic breadth and depth
  • It better prepares candidates for the academic challenges of university
  • It provides students with meaningful experiences beyond the classroom
  • It creates independent learners and strong writers
  • It cultivates an international mindset
  • It encourages candidates to be open-minded
 
 
 

For more information regarding the IB Secondary Section Policies, Please click on the following links:

 

 

For more information about the IB Diploma Programme at our school,

Please contact Dean El Hoss Head of IB +966 12 699 0019, ext.425.


 IB Offered Subjects:

Group 1: Studies in language and literature

  • Language A: Literature (SL/HL)
  • Language A: Language and literature (SL/HL)

Arabic, English

Language A: Literature {SL/HL}

Course Description

The course is built on the assumption that literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations and experiences of the world. The study of literature can, therefore, be seen as an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys and fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works.

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language.

Self-taught Languages

Students whose native language is neither English nor Arabic may also enrol in the language A: literature self-taught course at the Standard Level. This is an entirely self-guided course for students who have demonstrated comfort and ability levels reading and analysing literature in their native language. Special permission must be sought from the Head of IB before enrolling in a self-study course. 

Assessment

 Assessment lang1

Arabic, English

Language A: Language and Literature {SL/HL}

Course Description

The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. A key aim of the language A: language and literature course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts, which, it can be argued, is rarely straightforward and unambiguous. Helping students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning is central to the course.

The language A: language and literature course aim to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The course is designed to be flexible—teachers have the opportunity to construct it in a way that reflects the interests and concerns that are relevant to their students while developing in students a range of transferable skills. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception.

In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: language and literature course does not limit the study of texts to the products of one culture or of the cultures covered by any one language. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB Diploma Programme students because it contributes to a global perspective, thereby promoting an insight into, and understanding of, the different ways in which cultures influence and shape the experiences of life common to all humanity.

Assessment

 assesment lan2

Group 2: Language acquisition

  • Language B (SL/HL)
  • Language ab initio (SL)
Arabic, French, Spanish
Language B (SL/HL)
Course Description

Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills will be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts (HL), and will be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material will be chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding.

The study of an additional language adds to the international dimension of the Diploma Programme. While learning the target language, the student becomes aware of the similarities and differences between his or her own culture(s) and those of the target culture(s). With this awareness, a greater respect for other peoples and the way in which they lead their lives is fostered. Within the course framework, through the study of authentic texts, students investigate and reflect on cultural values and behaviours. The language B course achieves this reflection on cultural values and behaviours in different ways.

The language B course seeks to develop international understanding and foster a concern for global issues, as well as to raise students’ awareness of their own responsibility at a local level. It also seeks to develop students’ intercultural awareness, which contributes to the relationship between language B and the international dimension.

 

Syllabus

The topics for both levels (HL and SL) are divided into five areas:

  • Identity
  • Experiences
  • Human Ingenuity
  • Social Organization
  • Sharing the planet

In addition, students at HL study two works of literature.

Assessment

 Group2 langb1

Arabic

Language ab initio (SL)

Course Description

The language ab initio course is organised into five themes:

  • Identities
  • Experiences
  • Human ingenuity
  • Social organization
  • Sharing the planet

 

Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practise and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. Each language ab initio course has a language-specific syllabus that is used in conjunction with the guide. Language ab initio is available at SL only.

The study of an additional language adds to the international dimension of the Diploma Programme. Intercultural understanding is a major cohesive element of the syllabus in language ab initio. While learning the target language, the student becomes aware of the similarities and differences between his or her own culture(s) and those of the target culture(s). With this awareness, a greater respect for other peoples and the way in which they lead their lives is fostered. Within the course framework, through the study of authentic texts, students investigate and reflect on cultural values and behaviours.

The language ab initio course achieves this reflection on cultural values and behaviours in different ways. The course’s five broad themes are well suited to fostering an international perspective. The language ab initio course, albeit at a basic level, seeks to develop intercultural understanding and foster a concern for global issues, as well as to raise students’ awareness of their own responsibility at a local level.

Placement

The language ab initio course is designed for students with little or no prior experience of the language they wish to study. All final decisions on the appropriateness of the course for which students are entered are taken by the IB DP Coordinator in conjunction with teachers, using their experience and professional judgment to guide them. The most important consideration is that the language ab initio course should be a challenging educational experience for the student.

Assessment

 

Group2 langab2 

 

Group 3: Individuals and societies

  • Business Management (SL/HL)
  • Economics (SL/HL)
  • Geography (SL/HL)
  • History (SL/HL)

Business Management (SL/HL)

Course Description

Business management is a rigorous, challenging and dynamic discipline in the individuals and societies subject group. The role of businesses, as distinct from other organizations and actors in a society, is to produce and sell goods and services that meet human needs and wants by organizing resources. Profit-making, risk-taking and operating in a competitive environment characterize most business organizations.

Although business management shares many skills and areas of knowledge with other humanities and social sciences, it is distinct in a number of ways. For example business management is the study of decision-making within an organization, whereas economics is the study of scarcity and resource allocation, both on micro and macro levels. Business management examines the use of information technology in business contexts.

Business management studies business functions, management processes and decision-making in contemporary contexts of strategic uncertainty. It examines how business decisions are influenced by factors internal and external to an organization, and how these decisions impact upon its stakeholders, both internally and externally. Business management also explores how individuals and groups interact within an organization, how they may be successfully managed and how they can ethically optimize the use of resources in a world with increasing scarcity and concern for sustainability. Business management is, therefore, perfectly placed within the individuals and societies subject area: aiming to develop in students an appreciation both for our individuality and our collective purposes.

The Diploma Programme business management course is designed to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of business management theories, as well as their ability to apply a range of tools and techniques. Students learn to analyse, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels. The course covers a range of organizations from all sectors, as well as the socio-cultural and economic contexts in which those organizations operate.

Emphasis is placed on strategic decision-making and the operational business functions of human resource management, finance and accounts, marketing and operations management. Links between the topics are central to the course, as this integration promotes a holistic overview of business management. Through the exploration of six concepts underpinning the subject (change, culture, ethics, globalization, innovation and strategy), the business management course allows students to develop their understanding of interdisciplinary concepts from a business management perspective.

The course encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns, as well as issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR), at both a local and global level. Through the study of topics such as human resource management, organizational growth and business strategy, the course aims to develop transferable skills relevant to today’s students. These include the ability to: think critically; make ethically sound and well-informed decisions; appreciate the pace, nature and significance of change; think strategically; and undertake long term planning, analysis and evaluation. The course also develops subject-specific skills, such as financial analysis.

 

Assessment

group3biz

Economics (SL/HL)
Course Description

Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3 – individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.

The IB Diploma Programme economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not studied in a vacuum; rather, they are applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate throughout the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on human end-goals and values.

The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world.

Assessment

group3eco

Geography (SL/HL)

Course Description

Geography is the study of people and the physical environment. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in the way people interact with environments in a variety of different contexts. Geographers seek to understand these relationships using inquiry and practical investigation techniques.

SL and HL

Students will examine these trends and patterns in-depth by studying the geography of food and health, the nature and extent of geophysical hazards such as hurricanes, earthquakes, droughts and the pattern of tourist, sporting and leisure activities at a number of scales from local to global. The core focus of the course is the study of global change. The topics are wide-ranging and include the changing population distribution of the world, our vulnerability to climate change and how people are responding to this challenge as well as looking at the social, political and economic realities of resource consumption.

HL students will undertake extension studies into global interactions. They will be able to focus on power, places and networks, the diversity of human development and the potential risks to our global society. Geography enables students to combine their interests in political and economic areas with studies on a global scale. Students will have the opportunity to develop values and attitudes which will empower them to feel confident about their future role as global citizens.

Fieldwork outside the classroom helps to develop a range of scientific and analytic skills that are transferrable across a range of disciplines as well as helping them apply geographic theory in a practical situation. Students will conduct an internal assessment project regarding the geographic distribution of economic functions of Jeddah.

Geography is a facilitating subject for entry to Science courses in the top 24 United Kingdom universities. It is also a desirable background subject for civil engineers, environmental scientists and environmental planners and lawyers.

Students who have not done Geography at IGCSE level are eligible to enrol in HL or SL Geography and should see the Head of geography to discuss this possibility.

Assessment

grop3Geo

History (SL/HL)

 

Course Description

History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present.

Students of history will learn how the discipline works. It is an exploratory subject that poses important questions without providing definitive answers. In order to understand the present, students engage with the past both through exposure to primary historical sources and through the work of historians. The historical study involves both the selection and interpretation of data and critical evaluation of it. Students of history should appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more evidence emerges. A study of history both requires and develops an individual’s understanding of, and empathy for, people living in other periods and contexts. It is highly relevant to anyone who seeks to pursue a career in politics, international relations, law or journalism.

The Diploma Programme fosters an understanding of major historical events in a global context. It requires students to make comparisons between similar and dissimilar solutions to common human situations, whether they be political, economic or social. It gives students a unique skill set for critical reasoning, which can be applied to many different career paths and is valued by Universities all over the world for its rigour. The content of the history course is intrinsically interesting and it is hoped that many students who follow it will become fascinated with the discipline, developing a lasting interest in it, whether or not they continue to study it formally.

The course focusses on Russia and USSR from the time of the Tsars until the fall of communism, authoritarian systems in various different states, European states in the interwar years, German, Italian and Japanese pre-World War II expansionism and The Cold War. The emphasis on the people of our collective History provides inspiration for emulation but also for caution. The concepts of power and their utility are deconstructed, as are the stresses and tensions of globally fluctuating structures. Art, culture and media are explicitly investigated to uncover a nation’s identity and are critiqued to provide an explanation of driving forces in constantly shifting paradigms of interests and reactions.

Assessment

group3History


Group 4: Sciences

  • Biology (SL/HL)
  • Chemistry (SL/HL)
  • Computer Science (SL/HL)
  • Environmental Systems and Societies(SL)
  • Physics (SL/HL)
  • Sports, health and exercise science (SL/HL)

Biology (SL/HL)

Course Description

Biology is the study of life. The first organisms appeared on the planet over 3 billion years ago and, through reproduction and natural selection, have given rise to the 8 million or so different species alive today. Estimates vary, but over the course of evolution, 4 billion species could have been produced. Most of these flourished for a period of time and then became extinct as new, better-adapted species took their place. There have been at least five periods when very large numbers of species became extinct and biologists are concerned that another mass extinction is underway, caused this time by human activity. Nonetheless, there are more species alive on Earth today than ever before. This diversity makes biology both an endless source of fascination and a considerable challenge.

An interest in life is natural for humans; not only are we living organisms ourselves, but we depend on many species for our survival, are threatened by some and co-exist with many more. From the earliest cave paintings to the modern wildlife documentary, this interest is as obvious as it is ubiquitous, as biology continues to fascinate young and old all over the world.

The word “biology” was coined by German naturalist Gottfried Reinhold in 1802 but our understanding of living organisms only started to grow rapidly with the advent of techniques and technologies developed in the 18th and 19th centuries, not least the invention of the microscope and the realization that natural selection is the process that has driven the evolution of life.

Biologists attempt to understand the living world at all levels using many different approaches and techniques. At one end of the scale is the cell, it's molecular construction and complex metabolic reactions. At the other end of the scale, biologists investigate the interactions that make whole ecosystems function.

Many areas of research in biology are extremely challenging and many discoveries remain to be made. Biology is still a young science and great progress is expected in the 21st century. This progress is sorely needed at a time when the growing human population is placing ever greater pressure on food supplies and on the habitats of other species and is threatening the very planet we occupy.

 Assessment

 grop4 bio

Chemistry  (SL/HL)
Course Description
Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is often called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.

Earth, water, air and fire are often said to be the four classical elements. They have connections with Hinduism and Buddhism. The Greek philosopher Plato was the first to call these entities elements. The study of chemistry has changed dramatically from its origins in the early days of alchemists, who had as their quest the transmutation of common metals into gold. Although today alchemists are not regarded as being true scientists, modern chemistry has the study of alchemy as its roots. Alchemists were among the first to develop strict experimentation processes and laboratory techniques. Robert Boyle, often credited with being the father of modern chemistry, began experimenting as an alchemist.

Despite the exciting and extraordinary development of ideas throughout the history of chemistry, certain things have remained unchanged. Observations remain essential at the very core of chemistry, and this sometimes requires decisions about what to look for. The scientific processes carried out by the most eminent scientists in the past are the same ones followed by working chemists today and, crucially, are also accessible to students in schools. The body of scientific knowledge has grown in size and complexity, and the tools and skills of theoretical and experimental chemistry have become so specialized, that it is difficult (if not impossible) to be highly proficient in both areas. While students should be aware of this, they should also know that the free and rapid interplay of theoretical ideas and experimental results in the public scientific literature maintains the crucial link between these fields.

 

The Diploma Programme chemistry course includes the essential principles of the subject but also, through the selection of an option, allows teachers some flexibility to tailor the course to meet the needs of their students. The course is available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study chemistry as their major subject in higher education and those who do not.

 

At the school level, both theory and experiments should be undertaken by all students. They should complement one another naturally, as they do in the wider scientific community. The Diploma Programme chemistry course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of science. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and digital technology skills, which are essential in a 21st-century scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

 

Assessment

grop4 Chim

Computer Science  (SL/HL)
Course Description

Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate.

The Diploma Programme computer science course is engaging, accessible, inspiring and rigorous. It has the following characteristics:

  • draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge
  • enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge
  • interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave
  • raises ethical issues
  • is underpinned by computational thinking.

Computational thinking involves the ability to:

  • think procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, recursively and think ahead
  • utilize an experimental and inquiry-based approach to problem-solving
  • develop algorithms and express them clearly
  • appreciate how theoretical and practical limitations affect the extent to which problems can be solved computationally.

During the course, the student will develop computational solutions. This will involve the ability to:

  • identify a problem or unanswered question
  • design, prototype and test a proposed solution
  • liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments.

Assessment

grop4 Comput

Environmental Systems and Societies (SL)
Course Description

As a transdisciplinary subject, environmental systems and societies is designed to combine the techniques and knowledge associated with group 4 (the experimental sciences) with those associated with group 3 (individuals and societies). By choosing to study a transdisciplinary course such as this as part of their diploma, students are able to satisfy the requirements for both groups 3 and 4 of the hexagon, thus allowing them to choose another subject from any hexagon group (including another group 3 or 4 subject). Transdisciplinary subjects, therefore, introduce more flexibility into the IB Diploma Programme. The environmental systems and societies course is offered at SL only.

 

The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students’ attention will be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues.

 
Assessment 
grop4 enviro
Physics (SL/HL)
Course Description

Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself from the very smallest particles—currently accepted as quarks, which may be truly fundamental—to the vast distances between galaxies.

The scientific processes carried out by the most eminent scientists in the past are the same ones followed by working physicists today and, crucially, are also accessible to students in schools. Early in the development of science, physicists were both theoreticians and experimenters (natural philosophers). The body of scientific knowledge has grown in size and complexity, and the tools and skills of theoretical and experimental physicists have become so specialized that it is difficult (if not impossible) to be highly proficient in both areas. While students should be aware of this, they should also know that the free and rapid interplay of theoretical ideas and experimental results in the public scientific literature maintains the crucial links between these fields.

At the school level both theory and experiments should be undertaken by all students. They should complement one another naturally, as they do in the wider scientific community. The Diploma Programme physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and increase their abilities in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal and digital communication skills which are essential in a modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

 

Alongside the growth in our understanding of the natural world, perhaps the more obvious and relevant result of physics to most of our students is our ability to change the world. This is the technological side of physics, in which physical principles have been applied to construct and alter the material world to suit our needs, and have had a profound influence on the daily lives of all human beings. This raises the issue of the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. These concerns have become more prominent as our power over the environment has grown, particularly among young people, for whom the importance of the responsibility of physicists for their own actions is self-evident.

Lab Work

Students are required to complete 60 hours (HL)/40 hours (SL) of experimental activity and lab work. Laboratory work includes performing prescribed experiments as well as designing and performing experiments to test hypotheses. Lab work is most often performed in allocated class time, although students are expected to complete some lab work outside of usual class time, including the possibility of an occasional extended laboratory session on a weekend.

Twenty per cent of the final exam is put aside for internally assessed work. The internal assessment is in the form of a personal project: a single extended practical investigation into a topic of the students own choice that accounts for 10 hours of laboratory time.

Assessment

grop4 physics

Sports, Health and Exercise Science (SL/HL)

 

Course Description

Sports, exercise and health science (SEHS) is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigative skills. It is an applied science course within group 4, with aspects of biological and physical science being studied in the specific context of sports, exercise and health. SEHS is good preparation for courses in higher or further education related to sports fitness and health and serves as useful preparation for employment in the sports and leisure industries.

The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sports, exercise and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics, and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyse human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimension and ethics by considering sports, exercise and health relative to the individual and in a global context.

At the school level, both theory and practical work should be undertaken by all students. They should complement one another naturally, as they do in wider scientific study. The Diploma Programme SEHS course allows students to develop practical skills and techniques, and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of science. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills and digital technology skills, which are essential in a 21st-century scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right. The course is available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study SEHS as their major subject in higher education and those who do not. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.

 

Assessment

grop4 sportshealth

 

Group 5: Mathematics

  • Mathematics: Analysis and Approach (SL/HL)
  • Mathematics: Application and Interpretation (SL/HL)
Mathematics: Analysis and Approach (SL/HL)
Course Description

This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills, with an emphasis on Calculus. This subject is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects with substantial mathematics content such as mathematics itself, engineering, physical sciences, or some economics. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

 

The course focuses on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solve problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. Development of each topic should feature justification and proof of results. Students embarking on this course should expect to develop insight into mathematical form and structure and should be intellectually equipped to appreciate the links between concepts in different topic areas. They should also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments.

The internally assessed component, the exploration, offers students the opportunity for developing independence in their mathematical learning. Students are encouraged to take a considered approach to various mathematical activities and to explore different mathematical ideas. The exploration also allows students to work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop the skills they need for communicating mathematical ideas.

Assessment

Group5MATH analysis12

 
Mathematics: Application and Interpretation (SL/HL)
Course Description

This course caters for students who are interested in developing their mathematics for describing our world, modelling and solving practical problems using the power of technology. Students who take Mathematics: Applications and interpretation will be those who enjoy mathematics best when seen in a practical context. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as social sciences, natural sciences, medicine, statistics, business, some economics courses, psychology, and design.

The course an emphasis on statistics, modelling and use of technology –appropriate for those with an interest in the applications of mathematics and how technology can support this –SL will be appropriate for students who would previously have taken Mathematical studies SL –current HL mathematics statistics and discrete option content will form part of the HL course.

The internally assessed component, the exploration, offers students the opportunity for developing independence in their mathematical learning. Students are encouraged to take a considered approach to various mathematical activities and to explore different mathematical ideas. The exploration also allows students to work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop the skills they need for communicating mathematical ideas.

Assessment

Group5MATH Application121

 

Group 6: The arts

  • Music (SL/HL)
  • Visual Arts (SL/HL)
  • Theatre (SL/HL)
Music (SL/HL)
Course Description
 

Music functions as a means of personal and communal identity and expression, and embodies the social and cultural values of individuals and communities. This scenario invites exciting exploration and sensitive study.

Music and all of its associations may vary considerably from one musical culture to another: yet music may share similarities. Such richness offers a variety of ways to encounter and engage with a constantly changing world.

A vibrant musical education fosters curiosity and openness to both familiar and unfamiliar musical worlds. Through such a study of music, we learn to hear relationships of pitch in sound, pattern in rhythm and unfolding sonic structures. Through participating in the study of music we are able to explore the similarities, differences and links in music from within our own culture and that of others across time. Informed and active musical engagement allows us to explore and discover relationships between lived human experience and specific sound combinations and technologies, thus informing us more fully of the world around us, and the nature of humanity.

The Diploma Programme music course provides an appropriate foundation for further study in music at the university level or in music career pathways. It also provides an enriching and valuable course of study for students who may pursue other careers. This course also provides all students with the opportunity to engage in the world of music as lifelong participants.

 

Assessment

Grop6Music

Visual Arts (SL/HL)
Course Description

The visual arts are an integral part of everyday life, permeating all levels of human creativity, expression, communication and understanding. They range from traditional forms embedded in local and wider communities, societies and cultures, to the varied and divergent practices associated with new, emerging and contemporary forms of visual language. They may have a socio-political impact as well as ritual, spiritual, decorative and functional value; they can be persuasive and subversive in some instances, enlightening and uplifting in others. We celebrate the visual arts not only in the way we create images and objects but also in the way we appreciate, enjoy, respect and respond to the practices of art-making by others from around the world. Theories and practices in visual arts are dynamic and ever-changing and connect many areas of knowledge and human experience through individual and collaborative exploration, creative production and critical interpretation.

The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.

Supporting the International Baccalaureate mission statement and learner profile, the course encourages students to actively explore the visual arts within and across a variety of local, regional, national, international and intercultural contexts. Through inquiry, investigation, reflection and creative application, visual arts students develop an appreciation for the expressive and aesthetic diversity in the world around them, becoming critically informed makers and consumers of visual culture.

Assessment

 grop6Visual art
Theatre (SL/HL)
Course Description

Theatre is a practical subject that encourages discovery through experimentation, the taking of risks and the presentation of ideas to others. It results in the development of both theatre and life skills; the building of confidence, creativity and working collaboratively.

The IB Diploma Programme theatre course is a multifaceted theatre-making course of study. It gives students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors and performers. It emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists.

Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and to contextualize their work. The theatre course encourages students to appreciate that through the processes of researching, creating, preparing, presenting and critically reflecting on theatre— as participants and audience members—they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community and the world.

Through the study of theatre, students become aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives, developing an appreciation of the diversity of theatre practices, their processes and their modes of presentation. It enables students to discover and engage with different forms of theatre across time, place and culture and promotes international-mindedness.

Key features of the curriculum model

To fully prepare students for the demands of the assessment tasks, teachers should ensure that their planning addresses each of the syllabus activities outlined below, the content and focus of which is not prescribed. Students are required to investigate the core syllabus areas from the perspectives of the creator, designer, director, performer and spectator.

 

Assessment 

Grop6Theatre

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